DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKLIST – 5 TO 6 YEARS CHILD’S NAME

DEVELOPMENTAL CHECKLIST – 5 TO 6 YEARS
CHILD’S NAME: JENNIE TAYDATE OF BIRTH: 25 NOVEMBER 2018
OBSERVED BY: NUR SYAFIQAH BINTE AHMADDESIGNATION: ASSISTANT TEACHER
Indoor Outdoor
Milestones Date Observed Remarks Date Observed Remarks
GROSS MOTOR
Stands on one foot for 10 seconds or longer 18 Sep 2018 She lifted her left foot up and using her right leg while spreading both of her arms to balance. 17 Sep 2018 Hops, somersaults 18 Sep 2018 17 Sep 2018 While doing her sports activity, she uses both of her foot to hop over the hurdle.

Swings, climb Not Observed 19 Sep 2018 With the teacher’s assistance, she was seen climbing up the rock climbing of the playground.

May be able to skip Not Observed 19 Sep 2018 She was able to use the hula hoop to skip.

FINE MOTOR
Copies triangle and other geometric patterns 18 Sep 2018 Using her right hand, she uses a pencil grip to draw the shapes on the paper. Not Observed Draws a person with a body 18 Sep 2018 She was able to draw a human figure starting from the head, hair, body, arms, legs, a pair of hands, and feet. Not Observed Prints some letters 18 Sep 2018 She could neatly write words in sentences. Not Observed Dresses and undresses without assistance 18 Sep 2018 Besides putting on the button and unbuttoning her dress that was at the back of the dress, she was able to undress by lifting her dress up. Not Observed LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION
Recalls parts of a story 18 Sep 2018 After the teacher read to her class the story “Blown Away” by Rob Biddulph, the teacher calls her name out to retell a part of the story. She could not speak up at first but as when her teacher prompted her with questions like “What happened to the penguin after she flies the kite?” she could slowly answer them. Not Observed Speaks sentences of more than 5 words 18 Sep 2018 17 Sep 2018 While lining up, she told her partner, “Cayden, the teacher asks us to line up properly.”
Tells longer stories 18 Sep 2018 Not Observed Says name and address 18 Sep 2018 17 Sep 2018 Uses future tense; for example, “Grandma will be here” 18 Sep 2018 While having a conversation with her, she told me “Tomorrow my Papa is going to bring me to swimming!” 17 Sep 2018 COGNITIVE (LEARNING, THINKING, PROBLEM-SOLVING)
Can count 10 or more objects 18 Sep 2018 Her teacher gave the class cubes during numeracy lesson. She counted the number of cubes that she received that totals up 20 cubes. Not Observed Correctly names at least 4 colours 18 Sep 2018 She was able to identify more than 4 colours; Black, White, Red, Pink, Yellow, Green, Blue and Purple. Not Observed Can draw a person with at least 6 body parts 18 Sep 2018 She was able to draw a human figure starting from the head, hair, body, arms, legs, a pair of hands, and feet. Not Observed Can print some letters or numbers 18 Sep 2018 She could neatly write words in sentences. Not Observed Copies a triangle and other geometric shapes 18 Sep 2018 Using her right hand, she uses a pencil grip to draw the shapes on the paper. Not Observed Works in small groups for 5-10 minutes 18 Sep 2018 She was working with a group of 4 other children within 20 minutes. Not Observed Better understands the concept of time Not Observed The teacher told the class to wait for 5 minutes. After around 3 minutes, Jennie starts to ask, “Teacher, why is it so long?” Not Observed Knows about things used every day in the home (money, food, etc.) 18 Sep 2018 During their indoor playtime, it can be seen that she was playing with the cooking toys. She was able to identify the use of every utensil. E.g. Ladle is to use for scooping food out. Not Observed SELF-HELP
Uses a fork, spoon independently 18 Sep 2018 She holds the spoon by using her right hand to eat the food by herself during lunchtime. Not Observed Can chew with lips closed 18 Sep 2018 Not Observed Goes to the bathroom independently, with reminders 18 Sep 2018 Not Observed Undresses independently, may be able to unbutton and unzip 18 Sep 2018 Not Observed SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
Wants to please friends 18 Sep 2018 19 Sep 2018 During their outdoor playtime, she was seen agreeing to play catch with her playmates.

Prefers to be with friends 18 Sep 2018 19 Sep 2018 More likely to agree to rules 18 Sep 2018 19 Sep 2018 Likes to sing, dance, and act Not Observed Not Observed Shows more independence 18 Sep 2018 Not Observed Is aware of gender 18 Sep 2018 During their bath time, the girls in her class were told to bath first and she went into the toilet automatically, to take a shower. Not Observed Is sometimes demanding and sometimes very cooperative 18 Sep 2018 When she needs to use the scissors, she took the scissors from her table partner that was using the scissors. When her playmate told her to get other scissors, she told him, “I need to use the scissors!” The teacher told her to get other scissors and she followed the teacher’s command. Not Observed DEVELOPMENT RED FLAGS (5 TO 6 YEARS)
Exhibits extremely aggressive, fearful or timid behaviour Not Observed Not Observed Is unable to separate from parents Not Observed Not Observed Is easily distracted and unable to concentrate on any single activity for more than 5 minutes Not Observed Not Observed Shows little interest in playing with other children Not Observed Not Observed Refuses to respond to people in general Not Observed Not Observed Rarely uses fantasy or imitation in play Not Observed Not Observed Seems unhappy or sad much of the time Not Observed Not Observed Avoids or seems aloof with other children and adults Not Observed Not Observed Does not express a wide range of emotions Not Observed Not Observed Has trouble eating, sleeping or using the toilet Not Observed Not Observed Cannot differentiate between fantasy and reality Not Observed Not Observed Seems unusually passive Not Observed Not Observed Cannot understand prepositions (“put the cup on the table”; “get the ball under the couch”) Not Observed Not Observed Cannot follow 2-part commands (“pick up the toy and put it on the shelf”) Not Observed Not Observed Cannot give his first and last name Not Observed Not Observed Does not use plurals or past tense Not Observed Not Observed Cannot build a tower of 6 to 8 blocks Not Observed Not Observed Holds crayon with a fisted grasp Not Observed Not Observed Has trouble taking off clothing Not Observed Not Observed Unable to brush teeth or wash and dry hands Not Observed Not Observed (Adapted from the Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center – 2012)

Summary Report
Name of child: Jennie Tay
Gender: Female
Age: 5 years old
Height/Weight: 112cm / 17kg
Health/Medical Condition: Fit and no allergy.

Family background:
Jennie is staying with both of her parents, the elder brother, grandparents from her mum’s side and a helper.

Both of Jennie’s parents are full-time workers.

Jennie is the second child and has an older brother, Jayden Tay.

Jennie has an interest in drawing and colouring.

Jennie dislikes eating vegetables and the sound of the thunder.

Jennie’s family practices speaking in English more than Chinese.

Following her parent’s race, she is Chinese.

All the detailed information above was given by Jennie’s parents.

Jennie was observed four times, over the course of three days, totalling for six hours. She was observed in a classroom designated for 5-year-olds along with about 15 other children, staffed by a full-time teacher, and a part-time teacher. The space of the classroom was rather confined. For outdoor observation, she was observed during their sports activities at the multipurpose hall that is around the school compound.
Physical Development:
Gross Motor –
Strengths: Most of Jennie’s gross motor skills abilities were observed outdoor when they had their sports activity. It can be seen that she was able to lift her left leg up while using her right leg to balance. She extended both of her arms to stay balanced. This demonstrates that her gross motor skills are enhancing and she will be able to participate and enjoy activities that involve sport, self-regulation and concentration. She was likewise able to hop over an obstacle by using both of her foot together. She would be able to do activities that encourage her to test her muscle strength and abilities. She could climb the rock climbing with teacher’s assistance. She was able to display upper and lower body strength to pull and push her up and possess hand-foot-eye coordination. She could also skip by using the hula hoop. She will be able to participate in activities that involve large muscle groups such as legs and torso. It likewise helps her to develop eye-hand-body coordination. As an overall, Jennie was able to demonstrate specific gross motor skills.

Area of Improvement: She is progressing well for her gross motor skills. She will be able to enhance more on her well-developed skills.Fine Motor –
Strengths: The majority of Jennie’s fine motor skills were observed in her classroom. She was able to grasp the pencil appropriately using her right hand while drawing the geometric shapes, a person with the body and could even write words neatly. Her finger muscles are strong enough that it gives her small finger muscles some dexterity. She is able to work on her eye-hand coordination, accuracy, and visual perceptual abilities for functional tasks like manipulating with small items. As in general, Jennie was able to demonstrate specific fine motor skills.

Area of Improvement: It can be seen that she was unable to button and unbutton the button at the back of her dress as despite everything she needs somebody to help her out.

Intellectual Development:
Language/Communication –
Strengths: Jennie has displayed good language development. Despite the fact that she was reluctant to speak in front of her peers at first, however she was able to recall a part of a story after her teacher incited her with questions. She will be able to enhance more on her memory by storing it and recall when being asked. Amid the observation, it could be seen that she was able to speak sentences of more than five words and tells longer stories. As she is able to grasp words, it would be easier for her to convey herself better. She is also able to use the future tense. For example, when she stated, “Tomorrow my Papa is going to bring me to swimming”. She will be able to understand the difference between things that she has done, is doing and will do. As an overall, Jennie was able to exhibit specific language/communication skills.

Area of Improvement: Since she is progressing well for her language/communication skills, she is able to enhance more on her well-developed skills.

Cognitive –
Strengths: The majority of Jennie’s intellectual abilities were seen in her classroom. At the point when Jennie was trying to balance, she extended both of her arms to stay balanced. This demonstrates that she was able to have body mindfulness (proprioception) when required which in this scenario, she understood that by extending both of her arms; it keeps her from maintaining her balance. She was able to count ten or more objects by counting the number of 3D cubes that were given to her during numeracy lesson which she counted a total quantity of twenty cubes altogether. She will be able to count numbers in sequence and understands that the last number is critical as it represents the total number of things in the group. She was able to name more than four colours such as Black, White, Red, Pink, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Purple. This demonstrates that she has a decent knowledge of colours. She was able to draw a person with more than six body parts starting from the head, hair, body, arms, legs, a pair of hands, and feet. She was able to copy shapes and write words neatly in sentences by using her right hand. She would be able to recognize basic shapes and know the distinctive orientations of the shapes. She could work with a group of four other children within twenty minutes. It shows that she is able to build up her social skills through structured interaction by using language to express her thoughts and needs with her peers to accomplish a task. She has a decent knowledge of the things that are utilized each day at home whereby during their indoor playtime, she was able to distinguish that a ladle is used to scoop food out. As a general, Jennie was able to demonstrate specific cognitive skills.

Area of Improvement: During the observation, her class was told to sit tight for 5 minutes. After around 3 minutes, she begins to ask, “Teacher, why is it so long?” This demonstrates that she does not have a better understanding of the concept of time.

Emotional Development:
Emotional –
Strengths: It has been observed that when her table partner told her to get a different scissors when she was utilizing it, she attempts to solve the issue by giving her reasons. She was also able to get along well with others in the classroom and/or on the playground. As in general, Jennie was able to demonstrate specific emotional abilities, however; she does not express her emotions well.

Area of Improvement: At the point when her teacher calls her name out to retell a part of the story “Blown Away” by Bob Biddulph, she was not ready to speak up until her teacher prompted her with questions “What happened to the penguin after she fly the kite?” then she was able to gradually answer them. Throughout the observation, she also did not display any singing, dancing and acting.
Social Development:
Social –
Strengths: She appreciates her time with her peers. She was seen participating in a range of discussion with differing accomplices by agreeing to play catch with her playmates. She was able to work with a group of four other children within twenty minutes. She was able to be aware of gender difference. As an overall, Jennie was able to demonstrate specific social aptitudes.

Area of Improvement: Since she is progressing well for her social skills, she is able to enhance more on her well-developed skills.

Through the observation, there are a portion of the theories from various researchers that reviews and understand child development in various areas.

In one of the observation, it was noticed that she was able to dress and undress without any assistance however she was unable to button and unbutton on her own and needed assistance. In Lev Vygotsky’s theory, he sees cognitive development as a socially mediated process, in which children rely on the assistance of a grown-up and more expert peers as they acquire knowledge and problem-solve through Zone of Proximal Development and Scaffolding.
When she was having a conversation with me, she told me “Tomorrow my Papa is going to bring me to swimming!”. She was able to exhibit the use of future tense. In Jean Piaget’s second theory of cognitive development – Preoperational Stage, it expressed that mental images free child from the here and now, enabling them to think about objects when the items are not physically present, and to think about occasions before, during, and after their event.

During the observation, I could also notice that when her educator advised her to get different scissors, she did not give her reason on why she was using the scissors that her partner wants to use, rather, she just took after her teacher’s instruction. She was also able to comply with the teacher’s rule. This could be due to the classical conditioning that her educator has worked with her. Ivan Pavlov and John Watson found that by using classical conditioning, it can use stimulus to evoke reactions, thus, this can be used to instruct children to perform task or response to rules and so on with the provision of the trigger.

Based on the data gathered by Jennie’s parent, she is equally attached to both of her parents. However, on weekdays, she will be in school from morning till evening while both of her parents goes to work. On weekends, she will invest most of her time at home with her family. Her family does not by any mean practice to go for outings that regularly. Despite the fact that she was not exposed by associating with the public, she was able to adapt socializing well with her peers.

As her family communicates in English most of the time, this has given Jennie a great influence as she was able to use proper language and communication with her peers and teachers.
In one of the infamous example of this occurring is with Genie, a child who was locked in a dark room with extremely little human contact until the point that she was rescued at age 13. She was never able to develop language familiarity since it was never taught to her. In this way, by exposing the children with more language skills from a young age is additionally fundamental to child development.

Recommendations
Gross motor: Jumping for distance
Objective:
Materials and setting:
HYPERLINK “https://www.myactivesg.com/~/media/consumer/files/start%20out/children%20and%20youth/guide%20for%20parents/fundamental%20movement%20skills/locomotor%20skills/fms_kitforparents_locomotor_skills_jumping_for_distance.pdf”
Jumping for Distance – ActiveSG
Fine motor: Buttoning Frame
Objective: To develop Jennie’s fine motor skills in buttoning.

Materials and setting: Cloth/Felt, buttons, frame, needle, string.

Cognitive: During the observation, her class was told to wait for 5 minutes. After around 3 minutes, she starts to ask, “Teacher, why is it so long?” This shows that she does not have a better understanding of the concept of time.

Objective:
Materials and setting:
Language: Since she is progressing well for her language/communication skills, she is able to enhance more on her well-developed skills.

Objective:
Materials and setting:
Socio-emotional: She has a slight fear in speaking up in front of her classmates.

Objective: To be able to express herself through drawing.

Materials and setting:

Reference
Berk, L.E. (2003). Child development. Boston: Allyn and Bacon
David, B. P. (1998). Your Child. Australia, HarperCollins Publishers Ltd.

Jane, A., David, J., Wendy, R., Carole, J., (2006). The Developing World of the Child.London, Jessica Kingsley Publishers.Usha, G. (2014). Child Psychology: A Very Short Introduction. UK, Oxford University Press.